The PDQ system?

ninjazombie42
edited October 2013 in General Archive
Does anyone have any experience with this system?

How does weaknesses come into play? And how do I make sense of a weakness being improved through advancing? How does a clumsy limp(-2) for example, turn into a clumsy limp(+2), if a character choose to buy ranks in that quality when he or she "levels up"?

The system seems very interesting and fluffy, just like I like it, so I would appreciate any help with these littke kinks. Thanks:)

Comments

  • ninjazombie42
    Posts: 57
    No-one?
  • Basileus
    Basileus
    Posts: 589 edited October 2013
    The fluffy, "qualitative" end of the RPG system spectrum is starting to be dominated by Fate, I think, which may be why there isn't much experience with PDQ. Of course, they never were as popular as crunchy, "quantitative" RPG systems to begin with.

    As far as weaknesses go (i.e. something like "clumsy limp") in the core PDQ system weaknesses are always at Poor (-2), they never improve. It only ever improves to a higher level if you (the player and GM together, I would assume) determine that it has somehow become a strength that can be applied positively. Some weaknesses could be done straight (the canonical example being "hook-hand" which could start out as a bad thing that is hard to use, but improve to become effective in combat and intimidation), but others might require slight modification (something like "clumsy limp" might need to become "deceptive clumsiness" or "sympathetic limp") to become a strength.

    Generally though, PDQ requires a lot more GM oversight than many systems, because of things like that, where everyone playing has to agree that a given application of a rule makes sense in the context.

    My two bits...

    Edit: It should be noted that I haven't played PDQ, just seen it around a few times. So my input is more theoretical than practical.
    Post edited by Basileus on
  • ninjazombie42
    Posts: 57 edited October 2013
    Thank you!:) I don`t think it realy requiers more dm oversight though, as it is more about narrative fun and interaction, freeform improvisation and roleplaying than anything else, and absolutely not about balance and all that silly stuff!:)
    Btw. is Fate ruleslight or does it just focus it`s rules on other places than we are used to?
    Post edited by ninjazombie42 on
  • Basileus
    Basileus
    Posts: 589 edited October 2013
    For me, Fate hits the sweet spot between rules-light and providing structure. The core system consists of four things (aspects, skills, stunts, and stress) and the ways in which those elements are used is very intuitive and narrative focused, with minimal calculation or complexity. There are no separate systems for physical combat versus social interaction versus mental challenges, so you pick aspects, skills, and stunts to reflect the character, gameplay, and storyline you want.

    However, using those four elements you can create "extras" (such as rules for equipment, magic systems, organizations, vehicles, buildings, etc...) and get as progressively complex as you want. The Core rulebook is fairly long because it is stuffed to the brim with examples of the basic rules in action and optional ways to expand on the system.

    I would say Fate tries to provide player-balance (making sure everyone gets to participate and affect the story) rather than character-balance or power-balance. Its rules are structured such that the system doesn't care if I choose to play an ancient, resurrected warrior-archmage and you choose to play a one-armed, one-legged baker, so long as both of us get to figure dramatically in the story.


    Edit: I think it makes it good for ensemble casts like we see in literature and popular TV and movies, where not all characters are created equal but they share "screen time" and we care about them all (i.e. the Slayer next to the Zeppo)
    Post edited by Basileus on
  • ninjazombie42
    Posts: 57
    Thanks for the input! Yea, I`ve just got the Fate Core book and that is pretty much my impression too! I like how they focus more on the narrative and I really like what you say about combat and other types of challanges.
    I have really started to grow sick of and fed up with powerlevel-balance and crunh focus and meta-gaming! I am very happy to see systems like Fate and PDQ getting recognised! I don`t mind playing in crunchy systems, but as a gm I need more freeform and fluffy systems!
    I think PDQ is perfect for me right now! Truth and Justice looks great! And the Zantaboulos Zorecerer of Zo looks very fun and interesting too!:) Maybe I`ll give Fate a try later on, I mean I have the book already!:D
  • ninjazombie42
    Posts: 57
    But when would a player use a weakness? How do they come into play?
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